Tag Archives: therapy

A QUARTER OF EUROPEANS WITH OBESITY RELATED HEALTH ISSUES

Edited by STEVEN MILNER IIST VTCT from the Mail online

Europe With A QUARTER So Overweight Their Health’s At Risk

British Obesity levels are far worse than Germany, Italy and France with more than one in five British men classed as obese
By Claire Bates and Jenny Hope, Last updated at 9:42 PM on 25th November 2011

British women are officially the most overweight in Europe.
A quarter are so obese, so fat it threatens their health, according to alarming figures. This is a far higher proportion than in the other countries of Western Europe.

Obesity levels in the UK are far worse than Germany, Italy and France
British men are doing almost as badly, with more than one in five classed as obese, according to the authoritative figures. Experts are especially concerned by the young age at which so many women here are developing serious weight problems. A disturbing 16 per cent of young women aged 18 to 24 are obese – up to 16 times higher than many other European countries where the rate is between 1 per cent and 3 per cent. Young men are doing better, around 6 per cent are obese, but a worrying one third of men aged 45-64 are obese in the UK.

The deeply troubling figures are contained in a report from Eurostat, the EU’s statistics agency, which compares obesity levels in 19 countries from 2008/2009. Only the U.S. and Ireland, which are not included in the report, have higher obesity rates in the developed world. The latest table shows that only the former Soviet states of Latvia and Estonia – where one in five women is obese – approach the UK’s unenviable league-topping figure of 23.9 per cent. Women in Malta are catching up fast with rates of 22 per cent. Fifteen per cent of women in Germany are obese, while they are slimmer still in France (12.7 per cent) and Italy (9.3 per cent). The report says it is ‘particularly significant’ that a third of men in the UK are obese between the ages of 45 and 64. Overall, 22 per cent of British men are obese – and twice as many are overweight, say experts. Neville Rigby, director of policy and public affairs at the International Obesity Forum, said the British led the field in obesity – but in almost all developed countries two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese. “Levels of fatness are increasing all the time,” he said. “They go from overweight to obesity and affect more than 60 per cent of adults in most countries”. He goes on to say “The recessions is likely to make things worse, as people find they cannot afford the expense of buying healthier foods and fill up on fatty and sugary junk foods.” The National Audit Office estimates that obesity causes at least 30,000 deaths a year in the UK, through conditions such as cancer, heart disease, strokes and diabetes. It is shown to shorten lifespan, with individuals carrying four stone extra in weight at risk of losing three years in life expectancy.

The Body Mass Index measurement is used to calculate whether an individual is a healthy weight or not. This is calculated by dividing weight in kilos, by the square of his or her height in metres. Under 18.5 is underweight, between 18.5 and 25 is a healthy weight, 25 to 29.5 is overweight, 30 up to 35 is obese and over 35 is very obese. It means, for instance, a 5ft 6in woman weighing 14st would have a BMI of 30 and would be seen as obese. A 6ft man weighing 16st also has a BMI of 30. The formula has been criticised because it may penalise those who have a lot of muscle, said Mr Rigby, but he added: ‘Everyone knows when it’s fat.’ The report follows estimates made earlier this year in The Lancet medical journal which found that if current trends continue, the size of the obese population in the UK will increase by 11million over the next two decades – up from 15million at present.

By 2030 the problem will trigger a startling number of illnesses. There will be almost half a million more cases of heart disease and there will be around 700,000 extra cases of diabetes, with 130,000 more developing cancer as a consequence of their weight. Experts blame abundant energy-dense food, too little exercise and lack of will by policymakers to curb over-consumption. The Eurostat report links obesity with levels of education, saying that the better educated tend to be slimmer. Experts have been calling for ‘fat’ taxes on unhealthy food and a ban on advertisements aimed at children. Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum campaign group, said education was key to fighting obesity. “Until the UK puts domestic science properly back into the school curriculum, many women will continue to rely on cheap, ready meals and fast, processed foods for their families and themselves,” he added.

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Is there any merit to Functional Strength Training?

Q: What is functional strength training?
A: Functional strength training has become a popular buzzword in the fitness industry. Unfortunately, it is also subject to wide interpretation.

In extreme cases some personal trainers believe that by mimicking the explosive, ballistic activities of high-level competitive athletes, they are training in a functional manner. All too often, however, such training programs greatly exceed the physiological capabilities of the average exerciser, which ultimately increases the possibility that an injury might occur. Most would agree that there is nothing functional about sustaining an injury due to improper training. In many respects, functional strength training should be thought of in terms of a continuous movement. Training to improve functional strength involves more than simply increasing the force-producing capability of a muscle or group of muscles. Functional strength training involves performing work against resistance in such a manner that the improvements in strength directly enhance the performance of movements so that an individual’s activities of daily living are easier to perform. Simply put, the main aim of functional training is to transfer the improvements in strength achieved in one movement to enhancing the performance of another movement by affecting the entire neuromuscular system. Accordingly, individuals shouldn’t rely on any single group of exercises. Individuals should use all the weapons in their training arsenal. Functional strength training should serve as a supplement to traditional strength training, not as a replacement.

Properly applied, functional strength training may provide exercise variety and additional training benefits that more directly transfer improvements to real-life activities.

Source: Bryant, Cedric X. 101 Frequently Asked Questions about “Health & Fitness” and “Nutrition & Weight Control”.

Trigger Point Therapy

What Is Trigger Point Therapy?

By STEVEN MILNER IIST VTCT Qualified

What are trigger points?
A (Myofascial) trigger point is a hyper irritable and painful area. It’s called a trigger point or trigger site because it “triggers” painful responses, but a trigger point is more than just a tender muscle knot. It affects not only the muscle where the trigger point is found, but also causes “referred pain” in other tissues supplied by similar nerves. Trigger points are most notable in a taut band of muscles fibres. The trigger point will be the sorest point in the band. The therapist will locate and deactivate them using finger pressure. One technique is to pick up the muscle fibres in a finger pincer grip.

Here are a few symptoms you should know about:
If you have restless leg syndrome, you have TPs; if your teeth hurt, you have TPs; if your workouts plateau, you have TPs; if you have painful menses or irritable bowel syndrome, you have TPs.
Simply rubbing the surface of the skin with a massage lotion, a vibrating massage or using heat will not change the condition of a single trigger point. What it needs is sufficient deep sustained pressure to the knotted-up area.  As we work the Trigger Point, your body will undergo soft tissue release, allowing for increased blood flow, a reduction in muscle spasm and the break-up of scar tissue. It will also help remove any build-up of toxic metabolic waste. Your body will also undergo a neurological release, reducing the pain signals to the brain and resetting your neuro-muscular system to restore its proper function. In other words, everything will work the way it should again.

What You Should Know About Trigger Point Therapy?
It is used to treat painful trigger points that cause referred pain. Trigger points take time to create and it will likely take more than one session to get rid of it. These points are often areas of chronic “holding” and you need to learn how to move in different ways to keep them from recurring. Muscle Energy Technique can be enormously helpful when improving range of movement.

How Long Does It Take To Get Relief?
The length of time it takes to release a trigger point depends on several factors, one of which is how long you have had your trigger point. Other factors include the number of trigger points you have, how effective your current treatment is, and how consistently you can administer or receive treatment. Trigger points are very fickle; they need to be addressed frequently using a technique that will apply the pinpoint pressure that is needed. Attending a good massage therapist frequently enough to get a trigger point to release can become quite expensive, with my guidance I can show you how you can help yourself between treatments for faster more effective relief. What I’m saying here is that you need to take responsibility for managing your own care. From time to time, of course, you may find you need help from medical professionals. But even so, the more you know the better care you’re going to receive. This is naturally going to require some time and effort on your part, but the payoff will be faster with far better results.